RE & PSHCE

 

RE has a particular contribution to make towards the spiritual, moral, social and cultural education of each pupil. It involves learning about religion - understanding what religious people believe and do, and how they express themselves. Also learning from religion - making sense of who we are, of life, and of right and wrong.

We encourage respect for religious commitment and for those holding different beliefs

Religious Education is unique in the school curriculum in that it is neither a core subject nor a foundation subject but the 1988 Education Act states that ‘Religious Education has equal standing in relation to core subjects of the National Curriculum in that it is compulsory for all registered pupils’. Religious Education is taught in our school because it makes: “a major contribution to the education of children and young people. At its best, it is intellectually challenging and personally enriching. It helps young people develop beliefs and values, and promotes the virtues of respect and empathy, which are important in our diverse society. It fosters civilised debate and reasoned argument, and helps pupils to understand the place of religion and belief in the modern world”. (RE: realising the potential, Ofsted 2013).

Along with all maintained schools in Kent, Langton Green Primary School follows the overall aims for Religious Education (R.E.) as set out in the 2018 Kent Agreed Syllabus.

By following the 2018 Kent Agreed Syllabus we intend that Religious Education will:

  • Adopt an enquiry- based approach as recommended by Ofsted, beginning with the children’s own life experience before moving into learning about and from religion.
  • Provoke challenging questions about the meaning and purpose of life, beliefs, the self, and issues of right and wrong, commitment and belonging. It develops pupils’ knowledge and understanding of Christianity, other principal religions, and religious traditions that examine these questions, fostering personal reflection and spiritual development.
  • Encourage pupils to explore their own beliefs (religious or non-religious), in the light of what they learn, as they examine issues of religious belief and faith and how these impact on personal, institutional and social ethics; and to express their responses.
  • Enable pupils to build their sense of identity and belonging, which helps them flourish within their communities and as citizens in a diverse society.
  • Teach pupils to develop respect for others, including people with different faiths and beliefs, and helps to challenge prejudice.
  • Prompt pupils to consider their responsibilities to themselves and to others, and to explore how they might contribute to their communities and to wider society. It encourages empathy, generosity and compassion.
  • Develop a sense of awe, wonder and mystery.
  • Nurture children’s own spiritual development.

At Langton Green Primary School, the R.E. syllabus is based around a key question approach. In order to make Religious education engaging and enquiring we employ a variety of teaching methods including discussion, the development of thinking skills, drama through freeze frames etc, the use of artefacts, pictures, stories, use of periods of stillness and reflection and appropriate visits to a variety of places of worship.

 

Where possible we try to weave RE into the theme of our class learning journeys to ensure cohesion and relevance.

 

Our pupils have opportunities to encounter local faith communities through visits to local places of worship or visits from members of local faith communities.

 

Langton Green Primary School R.E. Curriculum Overview

 

 

Autumn

 

Spring

 

Summer

 

Year Gp

1

2

3

4

5

6

EYFS

Which stories are special and why?

Which people are special and why?

Which places are special and why?

Which times are special and why?

Where do we belong?

What is special about our world?

1

Who is a Christian and what do they believe?

(Harvest)

Who is a Christian and what do they believe?

(Christmas)

What does it mean to belong to a faith community?

What makes some places sacred?

How should we care for the world, and why does it matter?

How should we care for the world, and why does it matter?

2

Who is Jewish and what do they believe?

Who is Jewish and what do they believe?

What can we learn from sacred books?

How and why do we celebrate special and sacred times?

(Easter, Pentecost)

Who is a Muslim and what do they believe?

Who is a Muslim and what do they believe?

3

What do different people believe about God?

What do different people believe about God?

Why is the Bible important for Christians today?

 

Why is the Bible important for Christians today?

 

Why do people pray?

What does it mean to be a Christian in Britain today?

4

Why is Jesus inspiring to some people?

Why are festivals important to religious communities?

What can we learn from religions about deciding what is right and wrong?

What can we learn from religions about deciding what is right and wrong?

Why do some people think life is a journey? What significant experiences mark this?

What does it mean to be a Hindu in Britain today?

5

Why do some people believe God exists?

 

If God is everywhere why go to a place of worship?

What would Jesus do? Can we live by the values of Jesus in the 21st century?

What would Jesus do? Can we live by the values of Jesus in the 21st century?

What does it mean to be a Muslim in Britain today?

What does it mean to be a Muslim in Britain today?

6

Is it better to express your religion in arts or architecture or in charity and generosity?

Is it better to express your religion in arts or architecture or in charity and generosity?

What do religions say to us when the going gets hard?

What matters most to Christians and Humanists?

What difference does it make to believe in Ahimsa, (harmlessness) Grace, and Ummah (community)?

What difference does it make to believe in Ahimsa, (harmlessness) Grace, and Ummah (community)?